Stalking Rome: Weeds in the Eternal City


Rome is a city steeped in many layers of meaning and history.  One interesting layer to us of course is the emergent ecologies that have insinuated themselves into the urban context.  Some of the weeds we're finding are unique to this region of the Mediterranean, and some are common weeds that crop up in many cities around the world.  We'll be checking in here periodically to document some of our urban finds.  Below are a few from this week: 

Tall Fleabane (Conyza Sumatrensis)- A common urban weed throughout temperate regions of the world.  It seems to thrive in disturbed areas like this abandoned pavilion.  Each plant can produce up to 300,000 seeds, which are dispersed by the wind to far flung reaches of the urban landscape.

Tall Fleabane (Conyza Sumatrensis)- A common urban weed throughout temperate regions of the world.  It seems to thrive in disturbed areas like this abandoned pavilion.  Each plant can produce up to 300,000 seeds, which are dispersed by the wind to far flung reaches of the urban landscape.

The Aurelian Wall built between 271 AD and 275 AD is still intricately woven within the fabric of Rome. Many areas of the wall have been colonized by opportunistic plants such as the ones you see here.  These are actually edible capers (Capparis Spinoza).

The Aurelian Wall built between 271 AD and 275 AD is still intricately woven within the fabric of Rome. Many areas of the wall have been colonized by opportunistic plants such as the ones you see here.  These are actually edible capers (Capparis Spinoza).

Wlld Carrot (Daucus Carota), in it's final stage of life.  The white flowers give rise to beautifully architectural seed heads which hold hundreds of new recruits.  Each seed is equipped with a velcro-like set of stiffly hooked hairs ready to attach themselves onto the fur (or clothes) unsuspecting passers-by. 

Wlld Carrot (Daucus Carota), in it's final stage of life.  The white flowers give rise to beautifully architectural seed heads which hold hundreds of new recruits.  Each seed is equipped with a velcro-like set of stiffly hooked hairs ready to attach themselves onto the fur (or clothes) unsuspecting passers-by. 



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